Teaching with intelligent mindsets – Jamie Fitzgerald

Teaching for intelligent mindsets

Auckland 15th March 2015

The final presentation of the day was from Jamie Fitzgerald (A.K.A the guy from Intrepid NZ and First Crossings – www.inspiringperformance.co.nz) which I must admit was not (initially) as exciting for me as either Guy Claxton or Carol Dweck were. And I had lined up for ages to get my lunch, so I was tired and not really that keen on listening to some adventurer guy. What a fixed mindset I possessed and I am pleased to report that I was pleasantly surprised.

These are my stream of consciousness notes taken during his one hour presentation.


“The secret of success is not predicting the future, it’s creating people who can thrive in a future that cannot be predicted”

Fostering growth mindset – from position of curiosity

  • What could be possible?
  • How will we get there?
  • How will we work together?
  • How will we measure progress?
  • What have I learnt?

Am struck by the similarities in Jamie’s description of his planning for Antarctica exped and teaching as inquiry – the focusing inquiry, to set the path, the invention and adjustments on the way based on evidence…

Your brand is your rep – it is what others say about you when you are out of the room. Expectations in people’s minds and actual experiences need to align – uniqueness and consistency.

“If you don’t know what you stand for, you’ll fall for anything”

Example of his training for Antarctica of dragging tyres around suburban NZ streets…

“Hey loser, where is the rest of your car?”

Importance of the elevator pitch – keep your purpose succinct and invite questions

What does success look like?

Important question for teams to consider…

  • Establish daily routine
  • Hold self to account – importance of duration for success – try to create the wonderful day 7 days in a row

RASCI model as model for accountability

Responsibility, Approval, Supportive, Consult, Inform

IP RASCI Solid

Power of storytelling

  • To build resilience and perseverance via storytelling – someone who overcame struggle
  • What happened, how did they overcome it, what would that look like for us (in the context of their polar exploration)
  • Principle of shaping a conversation to affect or change or align mindset around progress through narrative

AGENCY! Growth mindsets is about making choices (Jamie’s work with Big Walk)

How raise an issue was important

  • Protocols around raising issues – rotation (row, eat, sleep) three times – then if still on your mind, you can raise it but it must be in German accent.
  • Decide to keep rowing or throw out sea anchor (love this as a metaphor)
  • Great to have a clear protocol

This is self-regulation! Pause, examine evidence, adjust if required…. Sometimes you leave others behind if they are not reflective!

 30 miles analogy

conditions were the same for all, all had opportunity to have conversation from position of curiosity, but “sometimes when you think you are making the least progress, you’re actually making the most”

“Let’s stop making the measurable things important and make the important things measurable” – MacNamara

 

When you’ve had a great day at work, what has happened?

CIP Research, UK

No 1 thing – made progress

Progress doesn’t need to be tangible – instead can be intangible

What gets measured (focused, informal convos) gets done.

Conversations of progress.

What have I learnt?

Need insights to create more opportunity in the future

“I would prefer to have goals in front of me which may not be attainable rather than a weekly shopping list” – Fitzgerald

would rather have 90% aligned and 100% committed, rather than 100% committed

#edchatnz Conference – my reflection blog

I love that there is a blogging meme going around – it is awesome. Here are my brief, yet well considered responses…

1. How did you attend the #edchatnz conference (face 2 face, followed online or didn’t)?

I was lucky enough to have the inaugural #edchatNZ conference at my lovely school, Hobsonville Point Secondary School. I was teaching, and therefore part of the conference on Friday, and totally F2F on Saturday.

2.  How many others attended from your school or organisation?

All! And several from my other organisation, NZQA – Steve and Alan as my former NZQA ‘bosses’!

3. How many #edchatnz challenges did you complete?

Hardly any! Maybe two. I helped @michaelcentrino with some Twitter stuff and was in the Taheretikitiki Learning Community Selfie

4. Who are 3 people that you connected with and what did you learn from them?

  • @pamhook – I have had the pleasure of working with Pam before but we had a lovely, critical discussion about the perils of a new school and SOLO taxonomy – these are unconnected ideas! – and I continued to be awed by her.
  • @Melmoore – I felt that I met Mel properly at the end of the conference and it was awesome to connect with someone who has similar ideas about assessment and how it can empower students. I know that we can connect online, which is just as good.
  • @marywoomble – great to be sitting in the same workshop and realise that we are retweeting each other – great minds think alike! Again, more time together could have been awesome and I’m looking forward to the possibilities presented through our #socscichatNZ

5. What session are you gutted that you missed?

– I would have loved to have been able to attend the political debate that @claireamos chaired. I was teaching, which was really cool as well (don’t get me wrong), but it would have been great to have been able to take students along to this as well. Luckily we are having our own political debate next week (student led) with local politicans but I won’t be there.

6. Who is one person that you would like to have taken to Edchatnz and what thing would they have learnt?

I would have loved to have my old principal and friend Vicki Barrie there as she is so keen on being innovative in education. Unfortunately she is currently working towards her masters so (rightly so) was busy over the weekend. I would have also loved for some of my fellow Classics teachers to be there – notably Paul Artus!

7. Is there a person you didn’t get to meet/chat with (F2F/online) that you wished you had? Why?

As I teaching on Friday, I felt that I didn’t meet heaps of people I wanted to meet/chat with. While we met, I wanted to hear more from Sonya (@vanschaijik) as I love a lot of what she is doing online. I really enjoyed by brief conversation with Red (@rednz) – want to connect more with him online, wickedly funny guy!

8. What’s the next book you are going to read and why?

I purchased The Falconer by Grant Licthman when I realised that everyone else in my office has already read it/ only have an electronic copy. I’ve got a long haul flight on Friday so it may be my reading there. I am also about to read “Lead with Wisdom: How Wisdom Transforms Good Leaders into Great Leaders” by Mark Strom. I purchased this in a bookdepository shopping spree and love that it seems to be a mix of leadership and philosophy.

9. What is one thing you plan to do to continue the Education Revolution you learnt about at #EdchatNZ?

Get more teachers on Twitter! As president of my subject association I feel that my role is to provide links for people and Twitter is a connection to the wider educational sphere. Watch this space!

10. Will you take a risk and hand your students a blank canvas?

Yes! Absolutely!!! I do this all the time and while it is not a nice feeling at time, a smidge uncomfortable, it is what we need to do. However, we need to be there to support them.

Writing slowly

I find myself in the same predicament as many of my students; I put off preparing my conference presentations for the upcoming New Zealand Association of Classics Teachers conference until the last minute. Structure is key and while my main presentation is nearly finished, it is the ignite 5 minute presentation which has me stumped. The nature of an ignite presentation puts a lot of pressure on the presenter – timed wittiness.  I am probably more aware of the intended audience for this than for any other conference I have presented at. It is hard to be responsible for planning and organising a national conference, cheers to the other three zealots, and then to have to present two things as well… Writing all this down has helped my perspective but not my presentation. Back to it!